ULSD Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Lubrication Problems

 
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2015 3:21 pm    Post subject: ULSD Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Lubrication Problems Reply with quote

Hello Friends, an update to the Lubricity issue in our Ultra Low Sulpher Diesel. (Lack of lubrication for injection systems and top end of engine.)

The common rail engines are having problems, in that fuel injection pumps are showing too much wear. Keep in mind our ULSD is even "Drier" with less Sulpher in PPM at 11 PPM. Sulphur is the Lubricant, and the old diesel was around 500 PPM Sulphur and gold coloured. It is now clear as water and only 11 PPM Exclamation If you love your motor better research the Lubricant additives range... Idea

Take it seriously, and I would use an additive as there is good evidence our ULSD is lacking in proper Lubricity (lubrication ability).
Further, I got interested because of my experience and I offer my personal evidence: The fuel injection pump in my 100 Series should have been good for about 300,00-400,000 kms or more in the “Good Ole Days” of the golden coloured Sulpher diesel.... Not only did it not last that long, it was stuffed and worn out at 165,000.. Less than half its life.... And that is NOT a very sensitive injection system when compared to the 200 Series for instance.

Here is Lab testing of the top most common Diesel Lubricant additives... The only Independent Lab Testing I have ever seen of the top 20... The Green Band is all lubricity added in the test, white is a non event and the red band actually hurt the lubricity of the fuel... In the U.S. Standyne is a standard people use, and it tested neutral, as in no advantage.

The one so far I have found that is available here is the Amsoil Diesel Concentrate... Number 9, not brilliant but better than no additive in the ULSD... There is at least one Agent in Sydney area, find them on the Internet... Anyway here are the test results in a table:



If you cannot copy and blow this up, you can see the original on the Powerstroke Forum on:

http://www.powerstroke.org/forum/general-6-0l-discussion/59507-diesel-additives-3.html
It was copied here from the report.

CONCLUSIONS:
Products 1 through 4 were able to improve the fuel to an HFRR score of 460 or better. This meets the most strict requirements requested by the Engine Manufacturers Association.
Products 1 through 9 were able to improve the fuel to an HFRR score of 520 or better, meeting the U.S. diesel fuel requirements for maximum wear scar in a commercially available diesel fuel.
Products 16 through 19 were found to cause the fuel/additive blend to perform worse than the baseline fuel. The cause for this is speculative. This is not unprecedented in HFRR testing and can be caused by alcohol or other components in the additives.
Amsoil Diesel Concentrate is number 9. I have used it, expensive but I think it does work..

TC-W3 the Synthetic Outboard Motor oil, is number 7 at 200:1 ratio HOWEVER, IT CANNOT BE USED IN DPF SYSTEMS, ONLY OLDER STYLE DIESELS… It will plug up the DPF, so no good....

Now there is a new Player available widely in Australia: I have seen a Caltex report on the HFRR testing on "Fuel Doctor", and the wear test came in with a score of 301. That would put it in the top 4 for least wear on the fuel injection system at around the 250:1 range. I have been using in all of my trucks for about two years now. It is supposed to actually aid in the DPF cleaning, and most of all beside the normal sludge and algae it kills off, it puts some added lubricity (lubrication) back into the diesel… I am currently continuing to use this additive, and might suggest that it is a bit of added insurance if you wanted to keep your tow vehicle long term… It not only will keep your tank and system clean, but it also adds some sorely needed lubrication to the common rail diesels… The reports indicate it will AID in the DPF Regeneration... In other words help clean the DPF..

Regards, Admin


Last edited by Bushtracker on Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:53 am; edited 1 time in total
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Ajay and Fletch



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Steve,

I may be a bit thick but what is the new product that you talk about in the last paragraph? The product that was from Caltex and subject to the HHFR report.

Regards ...
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Grumblebum and the Dragon



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I run a 100 series 1Hz - definitely an 'older diesel' been using TCW3 two stroke oil in it for the last two years. Runs 'sweet as' burns no oil at all and never gets hot.

John
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Ajay and Fletch,

It is called "Fuel Doctor" just like I said in that last paragraph. It is carried by a major automotive parts chain, can't remember which, Repco? I have seen it in many marine stores as it is big in marine diesel applications... You can contact them direct at "Fuel Doctors"... The HFRR tests were done by the Caltex Refinery Laboratory. I have been using it for about two years...

Phone: 07 3217 0077
Fax: 07 3375 4400
www.fueldoctors.com.au

Hello Grumblebum...

Yes, for your "Old School" diesel engine the full synthetic outboard motor oil TCW3 really takes care of the injector and top end lubrication. I could actually hear an engine sound change when added, smooths out and sounds happy...

However, I would not dismiss the added value of the Fuel Doctor for bad diesel or sludge in the tanks. I have been impressed by the demonstrations where the Fuel Doctor cleaned up bad diesel and tanks in the Marine Industry. I would carry a litre of it in travels just in case, and treat the tank a couple of times a year, if not sort of every tank or so...

Kind regards, and my wishes for good health go out to you, Steven Gibbs, Director, Bushtracker.
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krisandkev



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excuse my limited knowledge, but I have been using this

for years in my old tractor since they removed I believe the lead from diesel. Is this the same thing you are referring to and if so is the 'Fuel Doctor' something I could use in my 200 and the tractor? Thanks for sharing your knowledge, Kevin
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Mobi Condo



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Grumblebum and the Dragon wrote:
I run a 100 series 1Hz - definitely an 'older diesel' been using TCW3 two stroke oil in it for the last two years. Runs 'sweet as' burns no oil at all and never gets hot.

John


Mmm! Interesting. I would love to know the ratio here if I may, John. Looks quite interesting to try.
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mobi Condo:

I recommended the TCW3 about 7 years ago, the old Topic is in TIPS ON TOW VEHICLES... The ratio at about 200 to 1, there is a little smoke when you run it hard. The ratio at about 250 to 1 has little or no smoke even working hard..

NOTE TO ALL: Remember you cannot use this TCW3 synthetic oil lubricant in a DPF system...

krisandkev:

It is sulfur that has been removed from the diesel. Lead was the lube in petrol.
I have no experience with Flash Lube, but it is not listed in the top 20 for the HFRR Laboratory wear testing, and I have not see a HFRR wear ratio listed for it. Fuel Doctor can be used in both the 200 Series and the Tractor, no worries...

Kind regards, Steven Gibbs
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Rosiebear



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been using TCW3 synthetic outboard oil in my diesels, Nissan TD42's, and the iveco 3 lit FIC engine ( no DPF) for the last 10 years. There is a noticeable difference when I get a bit slack and forget to put it in.

The first time I tried it in my old patrol, unknown to the wife, we later went out for a few hours and when we were driving home she finally asked me what had I done to the "truck", even she noticed how much quieter the engine was running. Mainly because the injector pump was better lubricated, and the compression ignition process had changed slightly because I believe the TCW3 oil extends the ignition phase.

As for the Fuel Doctor I ran a major Qld government marine fleet for a number of years and used this product regularly in the diesel. Solved bug issues in marine diesel tanks throughout the whole state.

If you can get a small sample put some diesel in a vegemite jar add a teaspoon of water and shake it up till it emulsifies then let it sit for a few minutes and watch the water separate out again.

We also tried this test with some other well promoted products and none performed as well as the fuel doctor.

Then add a few drops of fuel doctor and shake again and leave it sit, the water wont separate out, therefore there is no water for the fuel bug to live in and feed on the diesel at the water diesel interface.

I cant speak towards the lubricity of the product, as this was not one of the original selling points, it was mainly sold as a fuel bug deterrent, by keeping the water in solution and denying the bug a 'home'.

I have been led to believe that BP bought out fuel doctor.
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Devils On The Prowl



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 6:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Been using fuel doctor since it came on the market, I'd done that very sample test, amazing. Convinced me.

I use it in my F250, Honda Generator & my Outboard motor.

It was a Castrol product and BP bought out Castrol
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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2016 5:01 pm    Post subject: Use of Lubricity Additives in ULSD Reply with quote

Some additional reading and adding to the debate about the use of 2 stroke oil in non-DPF engines.

Sulphur in Diesel

Today’s First World countries now demand the almost complete elimination of sulphur from diesel fuels. The benefits of removing sulphur from diesel are well documented and cover air quality, sulphur dioxide associated with acid rain, reduction in corrosive wear in engines (not to be confused with lubricity) and allows better exhaust treatment catalysts (Diesel Particulate Filters - DPF).

The impact of removing some or all of sulphur from diesel directly reduces the fuel’s lubricity. Removing sulphur also removes portions of other polar hydrocarbons that act as lubricants.

In Europe for example, EN590 describes the physical properties that all automotive diesel fuel must meet. In the USA, diesel fuel is defined by ASTM D975 (covers seven grades of diesel fuel oils suitable for various types of diesel engines).

Modern Engines

With sulphur content being directly linked to the fuels lubricating properties some low sulphur fuels may require additives to provide lubrication to fuel pumps and injection systems.

Modern diesel engines in most cases, particularly those with common rail injection and operating at higher pressures, directly rely on the diesel fuel to lubricate moving parts in injector pumps.

Untreated very low sulphur fuels can produce rapid wear and possible failure to items such as injector pumps.

In addressing this problem, lubricity improver additives are often added by oil companies during the time of processing Ultra Low Sulphur Diesel (ULSD). This becomes an effective method of restoring lubricity lost in severe refining processes.

Testing Diesel Fuel Lubricity

Testing diesel fuel lubricity (under controlled conditions) is by either:
• HFRR - High Frequency Reciprocating Rig – HFRR (ASTM D6079-11 Standard Test Method for Evaluating Lubricity of Diesel Fuels by the High-Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) and ISO 12156 -1 Diesel fuel - Assessment of lubricity using the high-frequency reciprocating rig (HFRR) - Part 1: Test method);
• SLBOCLE - Scuffing Load Ball on Cylinder Lubricity Evaluator (ASTM D6078 – 04 Standard Test Method for Evaluating Lubricity of Diesel Fuels by the Scuffing Load Ball-on-Cylinder Lubricity Evaluator).

The HFRR is the most common and values from this test are quoted in European diesel fuel quality standards (e.g. EN 590 where the HFRR value must not exceed 460 microns - μm).

Whether 460μm is adequate may be debatable. It would appear from reading that most engine manufacturers would want to see 400μm as a continuous repeat of the test (this statement needs to be qualified).

Although a responsible oil company has added the minimum additive to meet for example EN 590 of 460μm the fuel itself may still fall short of providing long term lubricity.

Diesel Fuels in Australia

Two (2) samples have been referenced - BP and Caltex. Both companies specify EN 590 and ASTM D975 as standards for diesel fuel (assume other leading oil companies apply the same or similar standards).

Based on BP’s Product Specification, the lubricity upper limit is 460μm as per EN 590 (0.46mm - typically 0.40mm - BP uses ASTM D6079 as its preferred method for lubricity testing).
Reference:
http://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp-country/en_au/products-services/fuels/ultimate-fuels/BP_Ultimate_Diesel.pdf

Caltex states that its Vortex Premium Diesel meets EN 590 (except for density and cetane number) and ASTM D975 (specific grade stated).
Reference:
http://www.caltex.com.au/FPL%20PDS/Vortex%20Premium%20Diesel.pdf

Please note that BP and Caltex have not stated the year publication of the standards to which its fuel meets. EN 590-2009 (Euro 5) is the latest standard where the maximum sulphur content is 0.001%.

An outstanding assumption is that since ULSD was released the lubricity value set has always been maximum 460μm.

Lubricity Additives

Additives apply a film or boundary layer that gives a cushioning effect. This keeps the metal surfaces apart and in turn helps to protect wear. The type, extent and concentrate of additives is entirely based on the lubricity improver and its ability to meet testing standards such as HFRR.

Obviously, the lower the value of 460μm is a better fuel lubricant – without impacting other important properties of the fuel. The adding of lubricity additives to ULSD can have a significant impact on the fuel’s lubricating properties.

Using additional additives may improve or worsen the situation. Evidence can be demonstrated only by actual independent testing of each product to determine its lubricity improvement and impact on other fuel properties. Of course long term usage will also prove the products reliability.

Use of 2 Stroke Oil as a Lubricity Improver

The debate as to whether 2 stroke oil in non-DPF engines acts as a benefit will continue.

Adding to the debate, see the following referenced technical study carried out by Sasol Energy Technology.

http://www.fuelexpert.co.za/2-stroke-oil-in-diesel-technical-study.php

This is a technical paper and gives a good overview of the outcomes of using 2 stroke oil in diesel engines. There are some parameters in the test that may differ from Australian diesel fuel, but in essence one can make a personal judgement about the use of 2 stroke oil.

This is in somewhat in conflict with the independent testing conducted by Arlen Spicer, a member of Dieselplace.com as outlined above in this thread.

I recommend those using or contemplating using 2 stroke oil in non-DPF engines read this paper to help make an inform decision.

I have not quoted or copied text information as the document is copyright ©2015 by SAIT2015, but has been reproduced with permission.

I suggest those using additives essentially as a lubricity improver obtain actual independent test results from the manufactures based on using samples the same or similar to Australian diesel fuel.

Hope this helps for those who consciously choose to use lubricity improver additives.

Regards,
Mark

Qualification: At present I use ‘Fuel Doctor’. I have not been able to obtain actual test results - similar to most additive manufacturers. The only qualification I received has been talking directly to a representative from Fuel Doctor (my understanding the original owner) and by reviewing other site references. I certainly have not qualified this by obtaining actual test results about Fuel Doctor's lubricity properties.
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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My 100 Series died an early death and the fuel injection system, pump and injectors, were worn so badly they recommended that I could replace them for not much more than the extensive rebuild. In the old amber diesel, these engines routinely went 400-500,000 kms. This got me on the past ten years of study and research..

Facts:
TC-W3 was extensively tested by the HFRR Labs, and it rated 7th in the top 20 additives worldwide. Only the top ten had a positive result in the wear testing, and most or all above TC-W3 are not widely available in Australia. Bio-Fuel was up there, and an insider in the Refineries tells me that it is added to the ULSD to try and compromise the lack of lubricity, in a 4-5% ratio. However, he also stated that it is on availability and sometimes varies. I, like other report, can hear the difference in my engines with 200-1 or 250 to 1 TC-W3.

Note: TC-W3 is not good for DPF systems, however it did rate 7th, Amsoil synthetic diesel additive was 9th. For the EPA DPF systems, Fuel Doctor claims very high results in the HFRR testing, but I have not seen the reports. Also, it would have to be in much higher dosages than indicated to offer effective lubricity. I can actually hear the results with a quieting effect on the top end of an engine, dosed with 200 to 1 TC-W3, but again not for use in DPF systems or it will clog up the DPF. The test results are widely published.

Lab tests: HFRR - High Frequency Reciprocating Rig – HFRR (ASTM D6079-11
Standard Test Method for Evaluating Lubricity of Diesel Fuels by the High-Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) and ISO 12156 -1 Diesel fuel - Assessment of lubricity using the high-frequency reciprocating rig (HFRR) -

The best we can do here, is to try and add in some lubricity to extend the life of our engines. I am using TC-W3 in non-DPF engines, and Fuel Doctor in the DPF and AdBlue/SCR DPF systems.

In Your Best Interests, on the road with the Ranger
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